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COMPOSERS and ERAS
(composers names marked in orange below denotes those who have been played on the show over the last 11 years)
(the list is not exhaustive)
 

11th though 14th Centuries  -  Medieval

Medieval music is Western music written during the Middle Ages. This era begins with the fall of the Roman Empire and ends sometime in the early fifteenth century.
Medieval music was both sacred and secular. During the earlier medieval period, the liturgical genre, predominantly Gregorian chant, was monophonic. Polyphonic genres began to develop during the high medieval era, becoming prevalent by the later 13th and early 14th century. The development of such forms is often associated with the Ars nova.

The earliest innovations upon monophonic plainchant were heterophonic. The Organum, for example, expanded upon plainchant melody using an accompanying line, sung at a fixed interval, with a resulting alternation between polyphony and monophony. The principles of the organum date back to an anonymous 9th century tract, the Musica enchiriadis (popularly, if dubiously, attributed to the Flemish Monk Hucbald), which established the tradition of duplicating a preexisting plainchant in parallel motion at the interval of an octave, a fifth or a fourth.

Of greater sophistication was the motet, which developed from the clausula genre of medieval plainchant and would become the most popular form of medieval polyphony. While early motets were liturgical or sacred, by the end of the thirteenth century the genre had expanded to include secular topics, such as courtly love.

During the Renaissance, the Italian secular genre of the Madrigal also became popular. Similar to the polyphonic character of the motet, madrigals featured greater fluidity and motion in the leading line. The madrigal form also gave rise to canons, especially in Italy where they were composed under the title Caccia. These were three-part secular pieces, which featured the two higher voices in canon, with an underlying instrumental long-note accompaniment.

Finally, purely instrumental music also developed during this period, both in the context of a growing theatrical tradition and for court consumption. Dance music, often improvised around familiar tropes, was the largest purely instrumental genre. The secular Ballata, which became very popular in Trecento Italy, had its origins, for instance, in medieval instrumental dance music


15th Century  -  Early Renaissance

Early Renaissance music (1400–1467) gradually dropped the late Medieval period's complex devices of isorhythm and extreme syncopation, resulting in a more limpid and flowing style. What their music "lost" in rhythmic complexity, however, it gained in rhythmic vitality, as a "drive to the cadence" became a prominent feature around mid-century.

Middle Renaissance music (1467–1534) and esp in the early 1470s started to be printed using a printing press. Music printing had a major effect on how music spread for not only did a printed piece of music reach a larger audience than any manuscript ever could, it did it far cheaper as well. Also during this century, a tradition of famous makers began for many instruments. These makers were masters of their craft. An example is Neuschel for his trumpets.

Towards the end of the 15th century, polyphonic sacred music (as exemplified in the masses of Johannes Ockeghem and Jacob Obrecht) had once again become more complex, in a manner that can perhaps be seen as correlating to the stunning detail in the painting at the time. Ockeghem, particularly, was fond of canon, both contrapuntal and mensural. He composed a mass in which all the parts are derived canonically from one musical line.

It was in the opening decades of the next century that music felt in a tactus (think of the modern time signature) of two semibreves-to-a-breve began to be as common as that with three semibreves-to-a-breve, as had prevailed prior to that time.

In the early 16th century, there is another trend towards simplification, as can be seen to some degree in the work of Josquin des Prez and his contemporaries in the Franco-Flemish School, then later in that of G. P. Palestrina, who was partially reacting to the strictures of the Council of Trent, which discouraged excessively complex polyphony as inhibiting understanding the text. Early 16th-century Franco-Flemings moved away from the complex systems of canonic and other mensural play of Ockeghem's generation, tending toward points of imitation and duet or trio sections within an overall texture that grew to five and six voices. They also began, even before the Tridentine reforms, to insert ever-lengthening passages of homophony, to underline important text or points of articulation. Palestrina, on the other hand, came to cultivate a freely flowing style of counterpoint in a thick, rich texture within which consonance followed dissonance on a nearly beat-by-beat basis, and suspensions ruled the day (see counterpoint). By now, tactus was generally two semibreves per breve with three per breve used for special effects and climactic sections; this was a nearly exact reversal of the prevailing technique a century before.

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16th Century  -  High Renaissance

In Venice, from about 1534 until around 1600, an impressive polychoral style developed, which gave Europe some of the grandest, most sonorous music composed up until that time, with multiple choirs of singers, brass and strings in different spatial locations in the Basilica San Marco di Venezia (see Venetian School). These multiple revolutions spread over Europe in the next several decades, beginning in Germany and then moving to Spain, France and England somewhat later, demarcating the beginning of what we now know as the Baroque musical era.

The Roman School was a group of composers of predominantly church music in Rome, spanning the late Renaissance and early Baroque eras. Many of the composers had a direct connection to the Vatican and the papal chapel, though they worked at several churches; stylistically they are often contrasted with the Venetian School of composers, a concurrent movement which was much more progressive. By far the most famous composer of the Roman School is Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina, whose name has been associated for four hundred years with smooth, clear, polyphonic perfection.

The brief but intense flowering of the musical madrigal in England, mostly from 1588 to 1627, along with the composers who produced them, is known as the English Madrigal School. The English madrigals were a cappella, predominantly light in style, and generally began as either copies or direct translations of Italian models. Most were for three to six voices.

Musica reservata is either a style or a performance practice in a cappella vocal music of the latter, mainly in Italy and southern Germany, involving refinement, exclusivity, and intense emotional expression of sung text.

In addition, many composers observed a division in their own works between a prima pratica (music in the Renaissance polyphonic style) and a seconda pratica (music in the new style) during the first part of the 17th century.



Late 16th and 17th Centuries;  Early Baroque  -  Late 17th and Early 18th Centuries;  High Baroque

Baroque music describes a style of Western Classical music approximately extending from 1600 to 1750. This era follows the Renaissance and was followed in turn by the Classical era. The word "baroque" came from the Portuguese word barroco, meaning "misshapen pearl", a negative description of the ornate and heavily ornamented music of this period; later, the name came to be applied also to its architecture.

Baroque music forms a major portion of the classical music canon, being widely studied, performed, and listened to. Composers of the baroque era include Johann Sebastian Bach, George Frideric Handel, Alessandro Scarlatti, Antonio Vivaldi, Georg Philipp Telemann, Jean-Baptiste Lully, Arcangelo Corelli, Claudio Monteverdi, Jean-Philippe Rameau and Henry Purcell.

The baroque period saw the development of functional tonality. During the period, composers and performers used more elaborate musical ornamentation, made changes in musical notation, and developed new instrumental playing techniques. Baroque music expanded the size, range, and complexity of instrumental performance, and also established opera as a musical genre. Many musical terms and concepts from this era are still in use today.

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Late 18th Century  -  Classical

The Classical period falls between the Baroque and the Romantic periods. The best known composers from this period are Joseph Haydn, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Ludwig van Beethoven, and Franz Schubert; other notable names include Luigi Boccherini, Muzio Clementi, Antonio Soler, Antonio Salieri, François Joseph Gossec, Johann Stamitz, Carl Friedrich Abel, Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach, and Christoph Willibald Gluck. Ludwig van Beethoven is also sometimes regarded either as a Romantic composer or a composer who was part of the transition to the Romantic; Franz Schubert is also something of a transitional figure, as are Johann Nepomuk Hummel, Mauro Giuliani, Friedrich Kuhlau, Fernando Sor, Luigi Cherubini, Jan Ladislav Dussek, and Carl Maria von Weber. The period is sometimes referred to as the era of Viennese Classic or Classicism since Mozart, Haydn, and Beethoven all worked at some time in Vienna, and Schubert was born there.

In the middle of the 18th century, Europe began to move toward a new style in architecture, literature, and the arts, generally known as Classicism, which sought to emulate the ideals of Classical antiquity and especially those of Classical Greece. While still tightly linked to the court culture and absolutism, with its formality and emphasis on order and hierarchy, the new style was also a cleaner style—one that favored clearer divisions between parts, brighter contrasts and colors, and simplicity rather than complexity. The remarkable development of ideas in "natural philosophy" had established itself in the public consciousness with Newton's physics taken as a paradigm: structures should be well-founded in axioms and be both well-articulated and orderly. This taste for structural clarity worked its way into the world of music, moving away from the layered polyphony of the Baroque period, towards a style where a melody over a subordinate harmony—a combination called homophony—was preferred. This meant that the playing of chords, even if they interrupted the melodic smoothness of a single part, became a much more prevalent feature of music. This, in turn, made the tonal structure of works more audible.

The new style was also pushed forward by changes in the economic order and in social structure. As the 18th century progressed, the nobility became the primary patrons of instrumental music, and there was a rise in the public taste for comic opera. This led to changes in the way music was performed, the most crucial of which was the move to standard instrumental groups and the reduction in the importance of the continuo—the harmonic fill beneath the music, often played by several instruments. One way to trace this decline of the continuo and its figured chords is to examine the decline of the term obbligato, meaning a mandatory instrumental part in a work of chamber music. In the Baroque world, additional instruments could be optionally added to the continuo; in the Classical world, all parts were noted specifically, though not always notated, as a matter of course, so the word "obbligato" became redundant. By 1800, the term was practically extinct.

The changes in economic situation also had the effect of altering the balance of availability and quality of musicians. While in the late Baroque a major composer would have the entire musical resources of a town to draw on, the forces available at a hunting lodge were smaller and more fixed in their level of ability. This was a spur to having primarily simple parts to play, and in the case of a resident virtuoso group, a spur to writing spectacular, idiomatic parts for certain instruments, as in the case of the Mannheim orchestra. In addition, the appetite for a continual supply of new music, carried over from the Baroque, meant that works had to be performable with, at best, one rehearsal. Indeed, even after 1790 Mozart writes about "the rehearsal", with the implication that his concerts would have only one.

Since polyphonic texture was no longer the main focus of music (excluding the development section) but rather a single melodic line with accompaniment, there was greater emphasis on notating that line for dynamics and phrasing. The simplification of texture made such instrumental detail more important, and also made the use of characteristic rhythms, such as attention-getting opening fanfares, the funeral march rhythm, or the minuet genre, more important in establishing and unifying the tone of a single movement.

Forms such as the concerto and sonata were more heavily defined and given more specific rules, whereas the symphony was created in this period (this is popularly attributed to Joseph Haydn). The concerto grosso (a concerto for more than one musician) began to be replaced by the solo concerto (a concerto featuring only one soloist), and therefore began to place more importance on the particular soloist's ability to show off. There were, of course, some concerto grossos that remained, the most famous of which being Mozart's Sinfonia Concertante for Violin and Viola in E flat Major.

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Early 19th Century  -  Romantic   -  Late 19th Century  -  Romantic/Modern

Romantic music as a movement evolved from the formats, genres and musical ideas established in earlier periods, such as the classical period, and went further in the name of expression and syncretism of different art-forms with music. Romanticism does not necessarily refer to romantic love, though that theme was prevalent in many works composed during this time period, both in literature, painting or music. Romanticism followed a path that led to the expansion of formal structures for a composition set down or at least created in their general outlines in earlier periods, and the end-result is that the pieces are 'understood' to be more passionate and expressive, both by 19th century and today's audiences. Because of the expansion of form (those elements pertaining to form, key, instrumentation and the like) within a typical composition, and the growing idiosyncrasies and expressivity of the new composers from the new century, it thus became easier to identify an artist based on his work or style.

Romantic music attempted to increase emotional expression and power to describe deeper truths or human feelings, while preserving but in many cases extending the formal structures from the classical period, in others, creating new forms that were deemed better suited to the new subject matter. The subject matter in the new music was now not only purely abstract, but also frequently drawn from other art-form sources such as literature, or history (historical figures) or nature itself.

Composers of the Romantic period sought to fuse the large structural harmonic planning demonstrated by earlier masters such as Haydn and Mozart with further chromatic innovations, in order to achieve greater fluidity and contrast, and to meet the needs of longer works or serve the expression that struggled to emerge. Chromaticism grew more varied, as did dissonances and their resolution. Composers modulated to increasingly remote keys, and their music often prepared the listener less for these modulations than the music of the classical era. The properties of the diminished 7th and related chords, which facilitate modulation to many keys, were also extensively exploited. Composers such as Beethoven, and later Richard Wagner, expanded the harmonic language with previously-unused chords, or innovative chord progressions.

Some composers analogized music to poetry and its rhapsodic and narrative structures, while creating a more systematic basis for the composing and performing of concert music. Previous practices, such as the sonata form, continued in use, and composers extended them. There was an increasing focus on melodies and themes, as well as an explosion in the composition of songs, in particular lieder.

The greater harmonic elusiveness and fluidity, the longer melodies, poesis as the basis of expression, and the use of literary inspirations were all present prior to this period. However, some composers of the Romantic period adopted them as the central pursuit of music itself. Composers were also influenced by technological advances, including an increase in the range and power of the piano and the improved chromatic abilities and greater projection of the instruments of the symphony orchestra.

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20th Century  - contemporary or modern

At the turn of the century, music was characteristically late Romantic in style. Composers such as Gustav Mahler and Jean Sibelius were pushing the bounds of Post-Romantic Symphonic writing. At the same time, the Impressionist movement, spearheaded by Claude Debussy, was being developed in France. The term was actually loathed by Debussy: "I am trying to do 'something different—in a way realities—what the imbeciles call 'impressionism' is a term which is as poorly used as possible, particularly by art critics" and Maurice Ravel's music, also often labelled with this term, explores music in many styles not always related to it.

Many composers reacted to the Post-Romantic and Impressionist styles and moved in quite different directions. In Vienna, Arnold Schoenberg developed atonality, out of the expressionism that arose in the early part of the 20th century. He later developed the twelve-tone technique which was developed further by his disciples Alban Berg and Anton Webern; later composers (including Luciano Berio and Pierre Boulez) developed it further still. Stravinsky (in his last works) explored twelve-tone technique, too, as did many other composers; indeed, even Scott Bradley used the technique in his scores for the Tom and Jerry cartoons.

After the First World War, many composers started returning to previous centuries for their inspiration and wrote works that draw elements (form, harmony, melody, structure) from this music. This type of music thus became labelled neoclassicism. Igor Stravinsky (Pulcinella and Symphony of Psalms), Sergei Prokofiev (Classical Symphony), Ravel (Le Tombeau de Couperin) and Hindemith (Mathis der Maler) all produced neoclassical works.

Important cultural trends often informed music of this period, romantic, modernist, neoclassical, postmodernist or otherwise. Igor Stravinsky and Sergei Prokofiev were particularly drawn to primitivism in their early careers, as explored in works such as The Rite of Spring and Chout. Other Russians, notably Dmitri Shostakovich, reflected the social impact of communism and subsequently had to work within the strictures of socialist realism in their music. Other composers, such as Benjamin Britten (War Requiem), explored political themes in their works, albeit entirely at their own volition. Nationalism was also an important means of expression in the early part of the century. The culture of the United States of America, especially, began informing an American vernacular style of classical music, notably in the works of Charles Ives, John Alden Carpenter, and (later) George Gershwin. Folk music (Vaughan Williams' Variants on Dives and Lazarus, Gustav Holst's A Somerset Rhapsody) and Jazz (Gershwin, Leonard Bernstein, Darius Milhaud's La création du monde) were also influential.

In the latter quarter of the century, eclecticism and polystylism became important. These, as well as minimalism, New Complexity and New Simplicity, are more fully explored in their respective articles. The term postmodern music is often applied to music that "reacts" to Modernism, though it is not always clear what the "reaction" precisely is.

 

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t h e  l i s t

composers names marked in orange denotes those who have been played on the show

Ancient (pre 500 AD)

Atheneus (circa 120 BC)
Mesomedes (circa 200 AD)
 

Medieval - 11th through 14th Centuries

Petrus Abaelardus (1079 - 1142)
Hildegard von Bingen (1098 - 1179)
Pérotin Magister (c. 1155 - c. 1250)
Léonin Magister (fl. c. 1150 - 1201?)
Philippe Le Chancelier (c. 1165 - 1236)
La Comptesse de Die (1180 - ?)
Walter von Der Vogelweide (c. 1170 - c. 1230)
Richart de Fournival (1201 - 1260)
Martin Codax (1205 - ?)
Alfonso X "El Sabio" (1221 - 1284)
Philippe de Vitry (1291 - 1361)
Pierre Des Molins (fl. c. 1375)

Ghirardello da Firenza (fl. c. 1375)
Lorenzo da Firenza (fl. c. 1375)
Jacopo da Bologna (fl. c. 1375)
Guillaume de Machaut (c. 1300 - 1377)
Francesco Landini (1325 - 1397)
Franchois Lebertoul (fl. c. 1400)
Johannes Ciconia (c. 1335 - 1411)
 

Early Renaissance - 15th Century

Walter Frye (fl. c. 1450)
John Dunstable (c. 1380 - 1453)
Guillaume Dufay (1400 - 1474)
Johannes Brassart (c. 1405 - c. 1450)
John Browne (? - 1498)
Johannes Ockeghem (1420 - 1497)
Antoine Busnoys (1430 - 1492)
Richard Hygons (c. 1435 - c. 1509)
Josquin Des Préz (1440 - 1521)
Alexander Agricola (c. 1446 - 1506)
Guillaume Le Rouge (1450 - 1465)
Edmund Turges (c. 1450 - ?)
Walter Lambe (c. 1450 - after 1499)
Robert Wylkynson (c. 1450 - 1515)
Heinrich Isaac (c. 1450 - 1517)
Jacob Obrecht (1457 or 1458 - 1505)

Jean Mouton (1459 - 1522)
Gijon (fl. c. 1460 - 1500)
Francisco de la Torre (fl. c. 1460 - 1500)
Juan de Triana (fl. c. 1460 - 1500)
Antoine Brumel (c. 1460 - c. 1515)
Pierre de la Rue (1460 - 1518)
Robert Fayrfax (1464 - 1521)
Richard Davy (c. 1465 - c. 1507)
William Cornysh (c. 1465 - 1523)
Juan Del Encina (1468 - 1529)
Francisco de Penalosa (1470 - 1528)

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High Renaissance - 16th Century

Luis de Narvaez (fl. c. 1540)
Giovanni Battista Conforti (fl. c. 1550)
Jean l'Heritier (1480 - 1552)
Gasparo Alberti (c. 1480 - c. 1560)
Robert Carver (1484 - 1568)
Nicholas Ludford (1485 - 1557)
Clement Janequin (1485 - 1558)
Ludwig Senfl (c. 1486 - c. 1543)
Costanzo Festa (c. 1490 - 1545)
John Taverner (c. 1490 - 1545)
Nicolas Gombert (c. 1490 - c. 1556)

Adrian Willaert (c. 1490 - 1562)
Francesco da Milano (1497 - 1543)
Heliodoro de Paiva (c. 1500 - 1552)
Philippe Verdelot (c. 1500 - before 1552)
Christóbal de Morales (c. 1500 - 1553)

Luis de Milan (1500 - 1561)

Marco da l'Aquila (fl. c. 1505 - 1555)
Jacques Arcadelt (1505 - 1568)
Christopher Tye (c. 1505 - 1572)
Thomas Tallis (c. 1505 - 1585)
Bálint Bakfark (1507 - 1576)
Johannes Lupi (1510 - 1539)
de Mudarra, Alonso (1510 - 1580)
Jacobus Clemens Non Papa (1515 - 1556)
Guillaume Morlaye (c. 1510 - c. 1558)
Antonio de Cabezón (c. 1510 - 1566)
Andrea di Cannaregio Gabrieli (1510 - 1586)

Giuseppe Guami (1510 - 1586)
John Sheppard (c. 1515 - c. 1559)
Antonio Carreira (c. 1515 - c. 1590)
Cipriano de Rore (c. 1516 - c. 1565)
John Black (c. 1520 - 1587)
Vincenzo Galilei (1520 - 1591)
Giovanni Perluigi Palestrina (1525 - 1594)
Francesco Guerrero (1527 - 1599)
Claude Le Jeune (1528 - 1600)
Alberto da Ripa (1529 - 1551)

David Peebles (fl. c. 1530 - 1579)
William Mundy (c. 1530 - before 1591)
Rodrigo de Ceballos (c. 1530 - 1591)
Guillaume Boni (c. 1530 - c. 1594)
Fabrizzio Caroso (c. 1530 - after 1600)
Pietro Paolo Borrono (fl. c. 1531 - 1549)
Hernando Franco (1532 - 1585)
Orlande de Lassus (1532 - 1594)
Claudio Merculo (1533 - 1604)
Francesco Soto de Langa (1534 - 1619)
Giaches de Wert (1535 - 1596)
Robert Whyte (1538 - 1574)
Giovanni Paolo Paladini (fl. c. 1540 - 1560)
Giovanni Leonardo Primavera (1540 - 1585)
Gioseffo Guami (1540 - 1611)
Hernando de Cabezón (1541 - 1602)
William Byrd (1543 - 1623)
Anthony Holborne (? - 1602)
Jacob Polonais (c. 1545 - 1605)
Thomas Luis de Victoria (c. 1548 - 1611)
François-Eustache Du Caurroy (1549 - 1609)

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Early Baroque - Late 16th and 17th Centuries

Adrian Le Roy (fl. c. 1550 - 1580)
Leonardo Meldart Fiamengo (fl. c. 1550 - 1600)
Fabrizio Dentice (fl. c. 1550 - 1600)
Pomponio Nenna (c. 1550 - 1613)
Pedro de Cristo (c. 1550 - 1618)
Giovanni Gabrieli (1553 - 1612)
Luca Marenzio (1553 - 1599)
Alonso Lôbo (c. 1555 - 1617)
Gabriele Villani (c. 1555 - 1625)
Manuel Rodrigues Coelho (c. 1555 - c. 1635)
Thomas Morley (1557 - c. 1603)
Conte Alfonso Fontanelli (1557 - 1622)
Don Carlo Gesualdo (1560 - 1613)
Felice Anerio (1560 - 1614)
Peter Philips (1560 - 1628)

William Brade (1560 - 1630)
Dario Castello (c. 1560 - c. 1640)
Hieronymus Praetorius (1560 - 1629)
John Angus (fl. c. 1562 - 1595)
Jan Pieterszoon Sweelinck (1562 - 1621)
John Bull (1562 - 1628)
John Dowland (1563 - 1626)
Sebastian Aguilera de Heredia (1565 - 1627)
Ascanio Mayone (1565 - 1627)
Giles Farnaby (1565 - 1640)
Duarte Lobo (1565 - 1646)

Alessandro Piccinini (1566 - 1638)
Frei Manuel Cardoso (1566 - 1650)
Claudio Giovanni Antonio Monteverdi (1567 - 1643)
Girolamo Conversi (fl. c. 1570 - 1590)
Diomedes Cato (c. 1570 - after 1615)
Giovanni Paolo Cima (1570 - 1622)
Alphonso Ii Ferrabosco (c. 1570 - 1628)
Bartolme de Selma (1570 - 1638)
Thomas Lupo (1571 - 1627)
Filips de Magalhaes (1571 - 1652)
Michael Praetorius (1571 - 1621)
Daniel Bacheler (1572 - 1618)
Thomas Tomkins (1572 - 1656)
John Wilbye (1574 – 1638)
Francisco de Peraza (fl. c. 1575 - c. 1600)
Thomas Weelkes (c. 1575 - 1623)
William Simmes (c. 1575 - c. 1625)
John Coprario (c. 1575 - 1626)
Estevao Lopes Morago (c. 1575 - 1630)
Estevao de Brito (1575 - 1641)
Giovanni Maria Trabaci (1575 - 1647)

Ennemond Gaultier (1575 - 1651)
Francisco Correa de Arauxo (c. 1576 - 1654)
Thomas Ford (1580 - 1648)
Giovanni Girolamo Kapsberger (c. 1580 - 1651)
Edward, Lord Herbert of Cherbury (1582 - 1648)
Gregorio Allegri (1582 - 1652)
Thomas Simpson (1582 - 1628)
Robert Johnson (c. 1583 - c. 1633)
Girolamo Frescobaldi (1583 - 1643)
Orlando Gibbons (1583 - 1625)
Heinrich Schütz (1585 - 1672)
Johann Hermann Schein (1586 - 1630)
Samuel Scheidt (1587 - 1654)
Francesco Turini (1589 - 1656)
Nicholas Strogers (fl. c. 1590 - 1620)
Richard Mico (1590 - 1661)
Juan Gutierrez de Padilla (c. 1590 - 1664)
Santini, Prospero (1591 - 1614)
Robert Dowland (ca. 1591 – 1641)
Jacques Gaultier (c. 1592 - after 1652)
John Jenkins (1592 - 1678)
Tarquinio Mercula (1594 - 1665)
Heinrich Scheidemann (1595 - 1663)
Biagio Marini (c. 1597 - c. 1660)
Luigi Rossi (1598 - 1653)
Bernardo Storace (fl. c. 1660)

Patrick Mando (1600 - c. 1650)
John O'Keover (c. 1600 - c. 1663)
Etienne Moulinie (1600 - 1669)
Denis Gaultier (1600 - 1672)
Girolamo Fantini (1602 - ?)
William Lawes (1602 - 1645)
Jacques Champion de Chambonnieres (1602 - c. 1672)
Don Marco Uccellini (1603 - 1680)
François Du Fault (1604 - 1670)
Joao Lourenco Rebelo (1610 - 1661)
Luigi Battiferri (1610 - 1682)
Henri Dumont (1610 - 1684)
Michel Lambert (1610 - 1696)
Pablo Bruna (1611 - 1679)
Francesco Lopez Capillas (1612 - 1673)
Christopher Simpson (c. 1615 - 1669)
Johann Jakob Froberger (1616 - 1667)
Joan Cererols (1618 - 1680)
Matthias Weckmann (c. 1619 - 1674)
Johann Rosenmuller (c. 1619 - 1684)

Anthoni Van Noordt (1620 - 1675)
Matthew Locke (1621 - 1677)
Dietrich Becker (1623 - 1679)
Johann Heinrich Schmelzer (1623 - 1680)
Jan Adam Reincken (1623 - 1722)
Jacques Gallot (c. 1625 - 1696)
Louis Couperin (1626 - 1661)
Charles Mouton (1626 - 1710)
Johann Caspar Kerll (1627 - 1693)
Lelio Colista (1629 - 1680)
Johann Michael Nicolai (1629 - 1685)
Jean-Baptiste Lully (1632 - 1687)
Andres de Sola (1634 - 1696)
Sieur de Sainte-Colombe (c. 1635 - c. 1690)
Jean-Henri d'Anglebert (1635 - 1691)
Esaias Reusner (1636 - 1679)
John Baston (fl. c. 1700)
Cesare Bendinelli (fl. c. 1700)
Gaspard Le Roux (? - 1707)

Dietrich Buxtehude (1637 - 1707)
Bernardo Pasquini (1637 - 1710)
Diogo Dias Melgas (1638 - 1700)
Pavel Josef Vejvanovsky (1640 - 1693)
Carolus Harquart (1640 - 1701)
Alessandro Stradella (1642 - 1682)
Johann Anton Losy van Losymthal (c. 1643 - 1721)

Marc-Antoine Charpentier (1644 - 1704)
Heinrich Ignaz Franz von Biber (1644 - 1704)
Juan Bautista Jose Cabanilles (1644 - 1712)
John Blow (1648 - 1708)
Nicola Matteis (? - 1714)
Giovanni Maria Capelli (1648 - 1726)
Pieter Bustijn (? - 1729)

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High Baroque - Late 17th and Early 18th Centuries

Petronio Franceschini (1650 - 1680)
Bernardo Clavijo del Castillo (fl. c. 1650 - c. 1700)
Antonio de Salazar (c. 1650 - 1715)
Johann Jacob Walther (1650 - 1717)
Robert de Visee (c. 1650 - c. 1725)
Domenico Gabrieli (1651 - 1690)
Arcangelo Corelli (1653 - 1713)
Georg Muffat (1653 - 1704)
Johann Pachelbel (1653 - 1706)
Pablo Nassarre (1654 - 1730)
Vincenz Lubeck (1654 - 1740)
Marin Marais (1656 - 1728)
Michel-Richard Delalande (1657 - 1726)
Giuseppe Torelli (1658 - 1709)
Henry Purcell (1659 - 1695)
Sybrant Van Noordt, Jr. (1660 - 1705)
Johann Kuhnau (1660 - 1722)
Sebastian Duron (1660 - 1716)
Alessandro Scarlatti (1660 - 1725)
Andre Campra (1660 - 1744)
Jean-Fery Rebel (1661 - 1747)
Georg Bohm (1661 - 1733)
Friederich Wilhelm Zachow (1663 - 1712)
Elizabeth Jacquet de la Guerre (c. 1664 - 1729)
Johann Christoph Pez (1664 - 1716)
Nikolaus Bruhns (1665 - 1697)
Johann Caspar Ferdinand Fischer (1665 - 1746)

Charles François Dieupart (1667 - 1740)
Antonio Lotti (1667 - 1740)
Michel Pignolet de Monteclair (1667 - 1737)
Jean Hyacinthe Theodore Gilles (1668 - 1705)
François Couperin (1668 - 1733)
Miquel Lopez (1669 - 1723)
Louis Marchand (1669 - 1732)
Antonio Caldara (1670 - 1736)
David Kellner (1670 - 1748)
Giovanni Bononcini (1670 - 1747)
Tomaso Albinoni (1671 - 1750)
Antoine Forqueray (1672 - 1745)
Francesco Mancini (1672 - 1737)
Andre-Cardinal Destouches (1672 - 1749)
Francesco Antonio Bonporti (1672 - 1748)
Jeremiah Clarke (1674 - 1707)
Jacques Hotteterre (1674 - 1762)
Michel de la Barre (c. 1675 - 1743 or 1744)
Johann Georg Reinhardt (1676 - 1742)
Louis-Nicolas Clerambault (1676 - 1749)
Antonio Lucio Vivaldi (1678 - 1741)
Johann Georg Pisendel (1678 - 1755)
Georg Friedrich Kauffmann (1679 - 1735)
Jan Dismas Zelenka (1679 - 1745)
Camilla de Rossi (c. 1680 - c. 1740)
Giuseppe Valentini (c. 1680 - 1740)
Jean-Baptiste Loeillet (1680 - 1730)
Georg Philipp Telemann (1681 - 1767)
Johann Mattheson (1681 - 1764)
Jean-François Dandrieu (1682 - 1738)
Jean-Joseph Mouret (1682 - 1738)
Johann Christoph Graupner (1683 - 1760)
Johann David Heinichen (1683 - 1729)
Jean-Philippe Rameau (1683 - 1764)
Alessandro Marcello (1684 - 1750)
Francesco Durante (1684 - 1755)
Giuseppe Matteo Alberti (1685 - 1751)
John Reading (1685 - 1764)
Louis Antoine Dornel (c. 1685 - 1765)
George Frideric Handel (1685 - 1759)
Johann Sebastian Bach (1685 - 1750)
Giuseppe Domenico Scarlatti (1685 - 1757)
Le Sieur de Machy (fl. c. 1686 - 1692)
Benedetto Marcello (1686 - 1739)
Nicola Antonio Porpora (1686 - 1768)
Sylvius Leopold Weiss (1686 - 1750)
Francesco Xaverio Geminiani (1687 - 1762)
Johann Friedrich Fasch (1688 - 1758)
Giovanni Lorenzo Somis (1688 - after 1770)
Ferdinand Zellbell (1689 - 1765)
Joseph Bodin de Boismortier (1689 - 1755)
William Babell (c. 1690 - 1723)
Paolo Benedetto Bellinzini (c. 1690 - 1757)
Jean Jacques-Christophe Naudot (1690 - 1762)
Thomas Roseingrave (1690 - 1766)
Pietro Baldassare (1690 - 1768)
Francesco Barsanti (1690 - 1772)
Gottfried Heinrich Stolzel (1690 - 1749)

Francesco Maria Veracini (1690 - 1768)
Gottlieb Theophil Muffat (1690 - 1770)
Unico Wilhelm Van Wassenaer (1692 - 1766)
Giuseppe Tartini (1692 - 1770)
Christoph Forster (1693 - 1745)
Johann Samuel Endler (1694 - 1762)
Louis-Claude Daquin (1694 - 1772)
Johan Helmich Roman (1694 - 1758)
Giuseppe Sammartini (1695 - 1750)
Pietro-Antonio Locatelli (1695 - 1764)
Pierre Fevrier (1696 - 1764)
Konrad Friedrich Hurlebusch (1696 - 1765)
Johann Melchior Molter (1696 - 1765)
Maurice Greene (1696 - 1755)
Johann Joachim Quantz (1697 - 1773)
Jean Marie l'aine Léclair (1697 - 1764)
François Francoeur (1698 - 1787)

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Classical/Romantic - Late 18th Century

Joseph Gibbs (1698 - 1788)
Johann Adolph Hasse (1699 - 1783)
Giovanni Benedetto Platti (c. 1700 - 1763)
Thomas Chilcot (c. 1700 - 1766)
Michel Blavet (1700 - 1748)
Giovanni Battista Sammartini (1701 - 1775)
Johan Joachim Agrell (1701 - 1765)
John Travers (1703 - 1758)
Johann Gottlieb Graun (1703 - 1771)
Joseph-Hector Fiocco (1703 - 1741)
Giovanni-Battista Pescetti (c. 1704 - c. 1766)
Carl Heinrich Graun (1704 - 1759)
Jose Antonio Carlos de Seixas (1704 - 1742)
František Antonín Ignac Tuma (1704 - 1774)
Joseph-Nicholas-Pancrace Royer (1705 - 1755)
Benjamin Franklin (1706 - 1790)
Baldassare Galuppi (1706 - 1785)
Carlo Cecere (1706 - 1761)

Antonio Teixeira (1707 - 1769)
Pietro Domenico Paradisi (1707 - 1791)
Jean Barriere (1707 - 1747)
Johann Baptist Georg Neruda (1708 - 1780)
Johann Adolph Scheibe (1708 - 1776)
Johann Gottlieb Janitsch (1708 - 1763)
Christoph Schaffrath (1709 - 1763)
Michel Corrette (1709 - 1795)
Charles Avison (1709 - 1770)

František Benda (1709 - 1786)
Franz Xaver Richter (1709 - 1789)
Jean-Noel Hamal (1709 - 1778)
Salvatore Lanzetti (c. 1710 - c. 1780)
John Parry (1710 - 1782)
Johann Georg Rollig (1710 - 1790)
Giovanni Battista Pergolesi (1710 - 1736)
Thomas Augustine Arne (1710 - 1778)
Arvid Niclas von Hopken (1710 - 1778)
Wilhelm Friedemann Bach (1710 - 1784)
William Boyce (1711 - 1779)
Ignaz Jakob Holzbauer (1711 - 1783)
John Hebden (1712 - 1765)
John Stanley (1712 - 1786)
Frederich The Great (1712 - 1786)
Johann Ludwig Krebs (1713 - 1780)
Per Brant (1714 - 1767)
Gottfried August Homilius (1714 - 1785)
Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach (1714 - 1788)
Christoph Willibald Ritter von Gluck (1714 - 1787)
Jacques Duphly (1715 - 1789)
Georg Christoph Wagenseil (1715 - 1777)
James Nares (1715 - 1783)
Hinrich Philip Johnsen (1716 - 1779)
Gaspard Fritz (1716 - 1783)
Felice De' Giardini (1716 - 1796)
Rudolf Straube (1717 - 1785)
Georg Matthias Monn (1717 - 1750)
Johann Wenzel Anton Stamitz (1717 - 1757)
Carl Heinrich Biber (1718 - 1749)
Johan Nicolaas Lentz (1719 or 1720 - 1782)
Antoine Mahaut (1719 - after 1775)
Johann Georg Leopold Mozart (1719 - 1787)
Johann Christoph Altnikol (1719 - 1759)
Anders Wesstrom (1720 - 1781)
Thomas Vincent (1720 - 1783)
Johann Friedrich Agricola (1720 - 1774)
Pieter Hellendaal (1721 - 1799)
Johann Philipp Kirnberger (1721 - 1783)
John Garth (1722 - 1810)
Johann Ernst Bach (1722 - 1777)
Pietro Nardini (1722 - 1793)

Jiri Antonín Benda (1722 - 1795)
Christiaan Ernst Graaf (1723 - 1803)
Carl Friedrich Abel (1723 - 1787)
Giovanni Battista Cirri (1724 - 1808)
William Walond (1725 - 1770)
Joseph Franz Xaver Dominik Stalder (1725 - 1765)
Josef Starzer (1726 - 1787)
Claude-Benigne Balbastre (1727 - 1799)
Armand-Louis Couperin (1727 - 1789)
Johann Gottlieb Goldberg (1727 - 1756)
Johann Wilhelm Hertel (1727 - 1789)
Johann Gottfried Muthel (1728 - 1788)
Franz Xaver Pokorny (1728 - 1794)
Padre Antonio Francisco Javier Jose Soler (1729 - 1783)
John Burton (1730 - 1785)
Antonio Maria Gasparo Gioachino Sacchini (1730 - 1786)
Capel Bond (1730 - 1790)
František Xaver Dusek (1731 - 1799)
Franz Xaver Brixi (1732 - 1771)
Franz Joseph Haydn (1732 - 1809)
Johann Christoph Friedrich Bach (1732 - 1795)
Johann Christian Fischer (1733 - 1800)
Johann Philipp Christian Schulze (1733 - 1827)
François-Joseph Gossec (1734 - 1829)
Johann Ernst Altenburg (1734 - 1801)
Karl Leopold Rollig (1735 - 1804)
Jean Gabriel Meder (c. 1735 - 1805)
Johann Christian Bach (1735 - 1782)
Johann Georg Albrechtsberger (1736 - 1809)
Josef Myslivecek (1737 - 1781)
Johann Michael Haydn (1737 - 1806)
Carlo Besozzi (1738 - 1791)
Philip Hayes (1738 - 1797)
Constantin Reindl (1738 - 1799)
Jakub Golabek (1739 - 1789)
Joseph Boulogne, Chevalier de Saint-George (c. 1739 - 1799)
Jan Krtitel Vanhal (1739 - 1813)
Karl Ditters von Dittersdorf (1739 - 1799)
Johann Schobert (1740 - 1767)
Giovanni Paisiello (1740 - 1816)
Anton Zimmermann (1741 - 1781)
Andre-Ernest-Modeste Gretry (1741 - 1813)
Giovanni Battista Marella (fl. c. 1800)
Johann Gottlieb Naumann (1741 - 1801)
Johann Baptist Krumpholtz (1742 - 1790)
Luigi Boccherini (1743 - 1805)
Francesco Petrini (1744 - 1819)
Marianne Anna Catharina Martinez (1744 - 1812)
Maddelena Laura Lombardini Sirmen (1745 - 1818)
Johann Peter Saloman (1745 - 1815)
Carl Philipp Stamitz (1745 - 1801)
Jan Vaclav Stich-Punto (1746 - 1803)
Jan Adam František Mica (1746 - 1811)
Johann Friedrich Peter (1746 - 1813)
Giuseppe Maria Gioachino Cambini (1746 - 1825)
James Hook (1746 - 1827)
William Billings (1746 - 1800)
Nicolas Scherrer (c. 1747 - 1821)
Johann Abraham Peter Schulz (1747 - 1800)
Leopold Jan Antonín Kozeluh (1747 - 1818)
Joseph Fiala (1748 - 1816)
Theodor Freiherr von Schacht (1748 - 1823)
Domenico Cimarosa (1749 - 1801)
Antonio Rosetti (1750 - 1792)
Johann Matthias Sperger (1750 - 1812)
Antonio Salieri (1750 - 1825)
Anton Thadaus Johann Nepomuk Stamitz (1750 - 1796)

Johann Franz Xaver Sterkel (1750 - 1817)
Dmitry Stepanovich Bortniansky (1751 - 1825)
Johann Samuel Schroeter (1752 - 1788)
John Marsh (1752 - 1828)
Muzio Clementi (1752 - 1832)
Edward Jones (1752 - 1824)
Ludwig August Lebrun (1752 - 1790)
Justin Heinrich Knechtl (1752 - 1817)
Johann Friedrich Reichardt (1752 - 1814)
Anton Stadler (1753 - 1812)
Etienne Solere (1753 - 1817)
Jean-Baptiste Sebastien Breval (1753 - 1823)
Bazvli Bohdanowicz (1754 - 1819)
Franz Anton Hoffmeister (1754 - 1812)
Giovanni Battista Viotti (1755 - 1824)
Federigo Fiorillo (1755 - 1823)
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756 - 1791)
Thomas Linley (1756 - 1778)
Joseph Martin Kraus (1756 - 1792)
Pavel Vranicky (1756 - 1808)
Ignaz Joseph Pleyel (1757 - 1831)
François Devienne (1759 - 1803)
Franz Vincenz Krommer (1759 - 1831)
Mateo Antonio Perez Albeniz (1760 - 1831)
Jan Ladislav Dussek (1760 - 1812)
Maria Luigi Carlo Zenobio Salvatore Cherubini (1760 - 1842)
Jose Galles (1761 - 1836)
Antonín Vranicky (1761 - 1820)
Jan Nepomuchene Wanski (1762 - 1800)
Franz Wilhelm Tausch (1762 - 1817)
Adalbert Gyrowetz (1763 - 1850)
Domenico Dragonetti (1763 - 1846)
Franz Danzi (1763 - 1826)
Etienne-Nicolas Mehul (1763 - 1817)
Franz Xaver Sussmayr (1766 - 1803)
Samuel Wesley (1766 - 1837)
Anton Eberl (1766 - 1807)
Bedřich Dionys Weber (1766 - 1842)
Rodolphe Kreutzer (1766 - 1831)
Filippo Gragnani (1767 - 1812)
Franz Alexander Possinger (1767 - 1827)
Leonhard von Call (1767 - 1815)
Andreas Jacob Romberg (1767 - 1821)
Carlos Baguer (1768 - 1808)
Johann Georg Heinrich Backofen (1768 - 1839)
Francesco Molino (1768 - 1847)
Carel Anton Fodor (1768 - 1846)
Hyacinthe Jadin (1769 - 1800)
Ferdinando Carulli (1770 - 1841)
Anton Reicha (1770 - 1836)
Friedrich Witt (1770 - 1836)
Peter Hansel (1770 - 1831)
Ludwig Van Beethoven (1770 - 1827)
John Baptist Cramer (1771 - 1858)
Thomas Bystrom (1772 - 1839)
Johan Willem Wilms (1772 - 1847)
Antonio Casimir Cartellieri (1772 - 1807)
Prince Louis Ferdinand Of Prussia (1772 - 1806)
Carl Ludwig Lithander (1773 - 1843)
François-Rene Gebauer (1773 - 1844)
Vaclav Jan Krtitel Tomasek (1774 - 1850)
Thomas Busby (1775 - 1838)
William Crotch (1775 - 1847)
François de Paule Jacques Raymond de Fossa (1775 - 1849)
Bernhard Henrik Crusell (1775 - 1838)
François-Adrien Boieldieu (1775 - 1834)
Ernst Theodor Amadeus Hoffmann (1776 - 1822)
Johann Evangelist Fuss (1777 - 1819)
Fredrik Emanuel Lithander (1777 - 1823)
William Russell (1777 - 1813)
Fernando Sor (1778 - 1839)

Sigismund Ritter von Neukomm (1778 - 1858)
Johann Nepomuk Hummel (1778 - 1837)
Franciszek Lessel (1780 - 1838)
François-Joseph Dizi (1780 - c. 1840)
Conradin Kreutzer (1780 - 1849)
Jean-François-Joseph Naderman (1781 - 1835)
Louis-François Dauprat (1781 - 1868)
Mauro Giuseppe Sergio Pantaleo Giuliani (1781 - 1829)
Anton Diabelli (1781 - 1858)
Daniel-François-Esprit Auber (1782 - 1871)
John Field (1782 - 1837)
Niccolo Paganini (1782 - 1840)
Justus Johann Friedrich Dotzauer (1783 - 1860)
Ferdinand Ries (1784 - 1838)
François-Joseph Fetis (1784 - 1871)
Ludwig Spohr (1784 - 1859)
Dionisio Aguado (1784 - 1849)
Andre Georges Louis Onslow (1784 - 1853)
Vincenzo Gambaro (1785 - 1824)
Karol Kazimierz Kurpinski (1785 - 1857)
Friedrich Wilhelm Michael Kalkbrenner (1785 - 1849)
Franz Xaver Schnyder von Wartensee (1786 - 1868)
Daniel Friedrich Rudolph Kuhlau (1786 - 1832)
George Frederick Pinto (1786 - 1806)
Carl Maria Friedrich Ernst Freiherr von Weber (1786 - 1826)
Archduke Of Austria Rudolph (1788 - 1831)
Friedrich Silcher (1789 - 1860)
Luigi Legnani (1790 - 1877)
Karol Lipinski (1790 - 1861)
Louis-Ferdinand Herold (1791 - 1833)
Carl Czerny (1791 - 1857)
Jan Vaclav Hugo Vorisek (1791 - 1825)
Franz Xaver Mozart (1791 - 1844)
Peter Joseph von Lindpaintner (1791 - 1856)
Andreas Spath (1792 - 1876)
Gioachino Antonio Rossini (1792 - 1868)
Philip Cipriani Hambly Potter (1792 - 1871)
Anton Bernhard Furstenau (1792 - 1852)
Isaak-Ignaz Moscheles (1794 - 1870)
Heinrich August Marschner (1795 - 1861)
Giuseppe Saverio Raffaele Mercadante (1795 - 1870)
Franz Adolf Berwald (1796 - 1868)
Franz Peter Schubert (1797 - 1828)
Domenico Gaetano Maria Donizetti (1797 - 1848)
Carl Gottlieb Reissiger (1798 - 1859)
Henri-Jerome Bertini (1798 - 1876)

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Romantic - Early 19th Century

Alois Beerhalter (1800 - 1852)
Marco Aurelio Zani de Ferranti (1800 - 1878)
Johannes Bernardus Van Bree (1801 - 1857)
Johann Wenzel Kalliwoda (1801 - 1866)
Joseph Franz Karl Lanner (1801 - 1843)
Vincenzo Bellini (1801 - 1835)
Charles-Auguste de Beriot (1802 - 1870)
Wilhelm Bernard Molique (1802 - 1869)
Franz Lachner (1803 - 1890)
Adolphe-Charles Adam (1803 - 1856)
Louis-Hector Berlioz (1803 - 1869)
Giacomo Panizza (1804 - 1860)
Leopold Eugen Mechura (1804 - 1870)
Johann Strauss I (1804 - 1849)
Jeanne-Louise Farrenc (1804 - 1875)
Mikhail Ivanovich Glinka (1804 - 1857)
Théodore Labarre (1805 - 1870)
Johann Peter Emilius Hartmann (1805 - 1900)
Fanny Cacilia Mendelssohn Hensel (1805 - 1847)
Juan Crisostomo Jacobo Antonio de Arriaga (1806 - 1826)
Napoleon Coste (1806 - 1883)
Johann Kaspar Mertz (1806 - 1856)
Adrien-François Servais (1807 - 1866)
Elias Parish-Alvers (1808 - 1849)
Auguste-Joseph Franchomme (1808 - 1884)
Jacob Ludwig Felix Mendelssohn (1809 - 1847)
Frederic Chopin (1810 - 1849)
Felicien Cesar David (1810 - 1876)
Robert Alexander Schumann (1810 - 1856)
Carl Otto Ehrenfried Nicolai (1810 - 1849)
Samuel Sebastian Wesley (1810 - 1876)
Ferenc Erkel (1810 - 1893)
Ludwig Schuncke (1810 - 1834)
Vincenz Lachner (1811 - 1893)
Charles Louis Ambroise Thomas (1811 - 1896)
Franz Liszt (1811 - 1886)
Ferdinand Hiller (1811 - 1885)
Sigismond Thalberg (1812 - 1871)
Julius Rietz (1812 - 1877)
Alexander Dargomyzhsky (1813 - 1869)
Sir George Alexander Macfarren (1813 - 1887)
Stephen Heller (1813 - 1888)
Wilhelm Richard Wagner (1813 - 1883)
Giuseppe Fortunino Frencesco Verdi (1813 - 1901)
Charles-Henri Valentin Alkan (1813 - 1888)
Heinrich Wilhelm Ernst (1814 - 1865)
Adolph von Henselt (1814 - 1889)

Mihaly Mosonyi (1814 - 1870)
Herman Severin Lovenskiold (1815 - 1870)
Friedrich Robert Volkmann (1815 - 1883)
Henry Hugh Pierson (1815 - 1873)
Johannes Verhulst (1816 - 1891)
Sir William Sterndale Bennett (1816 - 1875)
Manuel Saumell (1817 - 1870)
Niels Wilhelm Gade (1817 - 1890)
Henry Charles Litolff (1818 - 1891)

Charles François Gounod (1818 - 1893)
Felix Godefroid (1818 - 1897)
Franz von Suppé (1819 - 1895)
Stanislaw Moniuszko (1819 - 1872)
Jacques Offenbach (1819 - 1880)
Louis Theodore Gouvy (1819 - 1898)
Clara Wieck Schumann (1819 - 1896)
Henri Vieuxtemps (1820 - 1881)
Gustaf Adolf Heinze (1820 - 1904)

Friedrich Kiel (1821 - 1885)
Albert Franz Doppler (1821 - 1883)
Giovanni Bottesini (1821 - 1889)
Giulio Regondi (1822 - 1872)
Josef Joachim Raff (1822 - 1882)
Cesar-Auguste-Jean-Guillaume-Hubert Franck (1822 - 1890)
Edouard-Victoire-Antoine Lalo (1823 - 1892)
Edmund Thomas Chipp (1823 - 1886)
Bedřich Friedrich Smetana (1824 - 1884)
Carl Heinrich Carsten Reinecke (1824 - 1910)
Anton Joseph Bruckner (1824 - 1896)
Johann Strauss II (1825 - 1899)
George Frederick Bristow (1825 - 1898)
John Thomas (1826 - 1913)
Stephen Collins Foster (1826 - 1864)
Josef Strauss (1827 - 1870)
Woldemar Bargiel (1828 - 1897)
Louis Moreau Gottschalk (1829 - 1869)
Albert Hermann Dietrich (1829 - 1908)
Anton Rubinstein (1829 - 1894)
Peter Arnold Heise (1830 - 1879)
Hans Bronsart von Schellendorf (1830 - 1913)
Karl Goldmark (1830 - 1915)
Theodor Leschetizky (1830 - 1915)
Joseph Joachim (1831 - 1907)
Fredrick Vilhelm Ludwig Norman (1831 - 1885)
Charles Lecocq (1832 - 1918)
Johannes Brahms (1833 - 1897)
Alexander Porfirievich Borodin (1833 - 1887)
James Waterson (1834 - 1893)
Albert Heinrich Zabel (1834 - 1910)
Julius Reubke (1834 - 1858)
Peter Benoit (1834 - 1901)
Amilcare Ponchielli (1834 - 1886)
Cesar Cui (1835 - 1918)
Eduard Strauss (1835 - 1916)
Henryk Wieniawski (1835 - 1880)
Charles-Camille Saint-Saëns (1835 - 1921)
Clement-Philibert-Léo Delibes (1836 - 1891)
Sir William Schwenck Gilbert (1836 - 1911)
Mili Alexeyevich Balakirev (1837 - 1910)
Felix Alexandre Guilmant (1837 - 1911)
Charles-Emile Waldteufel (1837 - 1915)
Max Bruch (1838 - 1920)
Georges Alexandre-Cesar-Leopold Bizet (1838 - 1875)
Alexis Vicomte de Castillon (1838 - 1873)
John Knowles Paine (1839 - 1906)
Dudley Buck (1839 - 1909)
Josef Gabriel Ritter von Rheinberger (1839 - 1901)
Modest Petrovich Mussorgsky (1839 - 1881)
Piotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (1840 - 1893)
Louis Brassin (1840 - 1884)
Johan Severin Svendsen (1840 - 1911)
Hermann Goetz (1840 - 1876)
Donato Lovreglio (1841 - 1907)
Alexis-Emmanuel Chabrier (1841 - 1894)
Antonín Dvořák (1841 - 1904)
Karl Tausig (1841 - 1871)
Antoníno Pasculli (1842 - 1924)
Jules-Emile-Frederic Massenet (1842 - 1912)
Sir Arthur Seymour Sullivan (1842 - 1900)
Asger Hamerik (1843 - 1923)
Carl Michael Ziehrer (1843 - 1922)
Heinrich von Herzogenberg (1843 - 1900)
Edvard Hagerup Grieg (1843 - 1907)
Jan Levoslav Bella (1843 - 1936)
Charles-Marie-Jean-Albert Widor (1844 - 1937)
Pablo Martin Meliton de Sarasate (1844 - 1908)
Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov (1844 - 1908)
Claude Paul Taffanel (1844 - 1908)
Friedrich Nietzsche (1844 - 1900)
Hendrik Waelput (1845 - 1885)
Iosif Ivanovici (1845 - 1902)
Alphonse Hasselmans (1845 - 1912)
Gabriel-Urbain Fauré (1845 - 1924)
Alexander Andreyevich Arkhangelsky (1846 - 1924)
Robert Fuchs (1847 - 1927)
Ludwig Philipp Scharwenka (1847 - 1917)

Ignatio Cervantes (1847 - 1905)
Sir Alexander Campbell Mackenzie (1847 - 1935)
Augusta Mary Anne Holmes (1847 - 1903)
Sir Charles Hubert Hastings Parry (1848 - 1918)
Benjamin Louis Paul Godard (1849 - 1895)


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Romantic/Modern - Late 19th Century

Louise Aldolpha Le Beau (1850 - 1927)
Iver Holter (1850 - 1941)
Franz Xaver Scharwenka (1850 - 1924)
Alexander Sergeievich Taneyev (1850 - 1918)
Karel Komzak (1850 - 1905)
Zdeněk Fibich (1850 - 1900)
Tomas Breton y Hernandez (1850 - 1923)
Jan Blockx (1851 - 1912)
Paul-Marie-Theodore-Vincent d'Indy (1851 - 1931)
Frederick Corder (1852 - 1932)
Sir Frederic Hymen Cowen (1852 - 1935)
Hans Huber (1852 - 1921)
Sir Charles Villiers Stanford (1852 - 1924)
Wilhelm Posse (1852 - 1925)
Francesco Tarrega (1852 - 1909)
Arthur William Foote (1853 - 1937)
Maria Teresa Carreno (1853 - 1917)
Andre-Charles-Prosper Messager (1853 - 1929)
Juliusz Zarebski (1854 - 1885)
Paul Pabst (1854 - 1897)
Leos Janacek (1854 - 1928)
Alexander Alexandrovich Kopylov (1854 - 1911)
Moritz Moszkowski (1854 - 1925)
Engelbert Humperdinck (1854 - 1921)
John Philip Sousa (1854 - 1932)
George Whitefield Chadwick (1854 - 1931)
Amedee-Ernest Chausson (1855 - 1899)
Anatoli Liadov (1855 - 1914)
Giuseppe Martucci (1856 - 1909)
Johann Christian Sinding (1856 - 1941)

George Templeton Strong (1856 - 1948)
Sergei Ivanovich Taneyev (1856 - 1915)
Sir Edward William Elgar (1857 - 1934)
Cecile Chaminade (1857 - 1944)
Nikolai Artzibushev (1858 - 1937)
Georges-Adolphe Hue (1858 - 1948)
Eugène Ysaÿe (1858 - 1931)
Hans Rott (1858 - 1884)
Catharinus Elling (1858 - 1942)
Jenõ Hubay (1858 - 1937)
Giacomo Puccini (1858 - 1924)
Victor Herbert (1859 - 1924)
Nikolai Alexandrovich Sokolov (1859 - 1922)
Mikhail Mihaylovich Ippolitov-Ivanov (1859 - 1935)
Sergei Mikhailovich Liapunov (1859 - 1924)
Josef Bohuslav Foerster (1859 - 1951)
Hugo Wolf (1860 - 1903)
Emil Nikolaus von Reznicek (1860 - 1945)
Isaac Albeniz (1860 - 1909)
Gustav Mahler (1860 - 1911)
Ignacy Jan Paderewski (1860 - 1941)
Edward Alexander MacDowell (1860 - 1908)

Charles Martin Tornow Loeffler (1861 - 1935)
Anton Stepanovich Arensky (1861 - 1906)
Frederick (Fritz) Theodor Albert Delius (1862 - 1934)
Sir Edward German (1862 - 1936)
Maria François Maurice Emmanuel (1862 - 1938)
Achille-Claude Debussy (1862 - 1918)
Alphons Diepenbrock (1862 - 1936)
Leon Boellmann (1862 - 1897)
Bernhard Stavenhagen (1862 - 1914)
Felix Mikhailovich Blumenfeld (1863 - 1931)
Joseph Wihtol (1863 - 1948)
Henri-Constant-Gabriel Pierné (1863 - 1937)
Horatio William Parker (1863 - 1919)
Johan Halvorsen (1864 - 1935)
Eugene Francis Charles d'Albert (1864 - 1932)
Louis Glass (1864 - 1936)
Richard Strauss (1864 - 1949)
Joseph Guy Marie Ropartz (1864 - 1955)
Alberto Nepomuceno (1864 - 1920)
Alexander Tikhonovich Gretchaninov (1864 - 1956)
Harvey Worthington Loomis (1865 - 1930)
Preston Ware Orem (1865 - 1938)
Theophile Ysaye (1865 - 1918)
August de Boeck (1865 - 1937)
Lucien-Denis-Gabriel-Alberic Magnard (1865 - 1914)
Carl August Nielsen (1865 - 1931)
Paul Gilson (1865 - 1942)
Alexander Konstantinovich Glazunov (1865 - 1936)
Paul Dukas (1865 - 1935)
Jean (Johan) Julius Christian Sibelius (1865 - 1957)
Vasily Sergeyevich Kalinnikov (1866 - 1901)
Ferruccio Dante Michelangelo Benvenuto Busoni (1866 - 1924)
Erik Alfred-Leslie Satie (1866 - 1925)
Charles Wood (1866 - 1926)

Francesco Cilèa (1866 - 1950)
Jules Mouquet (1867 - 1946)
Desire Paque (1867 - 1939)
Enrique Granados (1867 - 1916)
Amy Marcy Cheney Beach (1867 - 1944)
Charles Koechlin (1867 - 1950)
Lodewijk Mortelmans (1868 - 1952)
Hamish Maccunn (1868 - 1916)
Max von Schillings (1868 - 1933)
Sir Granville Ransome Bantock (1868 - 1946)
Charles Sanford Skilton (1868 - 1941)
Henry Franklin Belknap Gilbert (1868 - 1928)
Albert Charles Paul Marie Roussel (1869 - 1937)
Hans Erich Pfitzner (1869 - 1949)
Sigismond Stojowski (1869 - 1946)
Siegfried Wagner (1869 - 1930)
Guillaume Lekeu (1870 - 1894)
Charles Arnould Tournemire (1870 - 1939)
Leopold Godowsky (1870 - 1938)
Louis Vierne (1870 - 1937)
Alfred Hill (1870 - 1960)
Vítězslav Novak (1870 - 1949)
Wilhelm Stenhammar (1871 - 1927)
Alexander von Zemlinsky (1871 - 1942)
Henry Kimball Hadley (1871 - 1937)
Alexander Nikolaevich Scriabin (1872 - 1915)
Hugo Alfvén (1872 - 1960)
Deodat de Severac (1872 - 1921)
Ralph Vaughan Williams (1872 - 1958)
Rudolf Tobias (1873 - 1918)
Max Reger (1873 - 1916)
Sergei Vasilievitch Rachmaninoff (1873 - 1943)
Jean-Jules Aimable Roger-Ducasse (1873 - 1954)
Henri Rabaud (1873 - 1949)
Daniel Gregory Mason (1873 - 1953)
Marie-Alphonse-Nicolas-Joseph Jongen (1873 - 1953)
Alexander Nikolsky (1874 - 1943)
Josef Suk (1874 - 1935)
Reynaldo Hahn (1874 - 1947)
Arnold Franz Walter Schoenberg (1874 - 1951)
Gustav Theodore Holst (1874 - 1934)
Charles Edward Ives (1874 - 1954)
Franz Schmidt (1874 - 1939)
Reinhold Glière (1875 - 1956)
Erkki Gustav Melartin (1875 - 1937)
Joseph Maurice Ravel (1875 - 1937)
Albert William Ketèlbey (1875 - 1959)
Samuel Coleridge-Taylor (1875 - 1912)
Mikolajus Konstantinas Ciurlionis (1875 - 1911)
William Yeates Hurlstone (1876 - 1906)
Ermanno Wolf-Ferrari (1876 - 1948)
Havergal Brian (1876 - 1972)
John Alden Carpenter (1876 - 1951)
Flor Alpaerts (1876 - 1954)
Manuel de Falla (1876 - 1946)
Mieczysław Karlowicz (1876 - 1909)
Pavel Chesnokov (1877 - 1944)
Thomas Frederick Dunhill (1877 - 1946)
Sergei Bortkiewicz (1877 - 1952)
Arthur Farwell (1877 - 1952)
Blair Fairchild (1877 - 1933)
Ernst von Dohnanyi (1877 - 1960)
Armand Marsick (1877 - 1959)
Roger Cuthbert Quilter (1877 - 1953)
Henry Balfour Gardiner (1877 - 1950)
Rutland Boughton (1878 - 1960)
Franz Schreker (1878 - 1934)
Josef Holbrooke (1878 - 1958)
M. Tournier (1879 - 1951)
Otakar Ostrcil (1879 - 1935)
Frank Bridge (1879 - 1941)
Philippe Gaubert (1879 - 1941)
Ottorino Respighi (1879 - 1936)
John Ireland (1879 - 1962)
Cyril Meir Scott (1879 - 1970)
Sir Herbert Hamilton Harty (1879 - 1941)
Nicolai Karlovich Medtner (1880 - 1951)
Ernest Bloch (1880 - 1959)
Paul Le Flem (1881 - 1984)
Béla Bartók (1881 - 1945)
Nicolai Yakovlevich Miaskovsky (1881 - 1950)
George Enescu (1881 - 1955)
Charles Wakefield Cadman (1881 - 1946)
Ignaz Friedman (1882 - 1948)
Gian Francesco Malipiero (1882 - 1973)
Haydn Wood (1882 - 1959)
Artur Schnabel (1882 - 1951)

Igor Stravinsky (1882 - 1971)
Percy Aldridge Grainger (1882 - 1961)
Karol Szymanowski (1882 - 1937)
Manuel Maria Ponce (1882 - 1948)
Joaquín Turina (1882 - 1949)
Zóltan Kodály (1882 - 1967)
Sir George Dyson (1883 - 1964)
Sir Arnold Edward Trevor Bax (1883 - 1953)
Anton Friedrich Wilhelm von Webern (1883 - 1945)
Arthur Meulemans (1884 - 1966)
Charles Tomlinson Griffes (1884 - 1920)
Artur Lemba (1885 - 1963)
Alban Berg (1885 - 1935)
George Sainton Kaye Butterworth (1885 - 1916)
Joseph Deems Taylor (1885 - 1966)
Wilhelm Furtwängler (1886 - 1954)
Michel Brusselmans (1886 - 1960)
Jef Van Hoof (1886 - 1959)
Eric Coates (1886 - 1957)
Rebecca Clarke (1886 - 1979)
Kurt Schwitters (1887 - 1948)
Oskar Lindberg (1887 - 1955)
Leevi Madetoya (1887 - 1947)
Heitor Villa-Lôbos (1887 - 1959)
Heino Eller (1887 - 1970)
Kurt Atterberg (1887 - 1974)
Alexei Vladimirovich Stanchinsky (1888 - 1914)
Grigoras Dinicu (1889 - 1949)
Cecil Armstrong Gibbs (1889 - 1960)
Jacques Ibert (1890 - 1962)
Bohuslav Martinu (1890 - 1959)
Maurice Schoemaker (1890 - 1964)
Federico Moreno Torroba (1891 - 1982)
Sergei Sergeyevich Prokofieff (1891 - 1953)
Marinus de Jong (1891 - 1984)
Sir Arthur Edward Drummond Bliss (1891 - 1975)
Yrjo Kilpinen (1892 - 1959)
Arthur Oscar Honegger (1892 - 1955)
Ferde Ferdinand Rudolph von Grofe (1892 - 1972)
Germaine Tailleferre (1892 - 1983)
Laszlo Lajtha (1892 - 1963)
Kaikhosru Shapurji Sorabji (1892 - 1988)
Darius Milhaud (1892 - 1974)
Herbert Howells (1892 - 1983)
Martian Negrea (1893 - 1973)
Andres Segovia (1893 - 1987)
Sir Eugene Goossens (1893 - 1962)
Rued Immanuel Langgaard (1893 - 1952)
Juliette Marie Olga Lili Boulanger (1893 - 1918)
Jean Absil (1893 - 1974)
Walter Hamor Piston (1894 - 1976)
Ervín Schulhoff (1894 - 1942)
Robert Russell Bennett (1894 - 1981)
Peter Warlock (1894 - 1930)
Ernest John Moeran (1894 - 1950)
Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco (1895 - 1968)
William Grant Still (1895 - 1978)
Gordon Jacob (1895 - 1984)
Walter Gieseking (1895 - 1956)
Paul Hindemith (1895 - 1963)
Howard Hanson (1896 - 1981)
Virgil Thomson (1897 - 1989)
Quincy Porter (1897 - 1966)
Erich Wolfgang Korngold (1897 - 1957)
Alexandre Tansman (1897 - 1986)
Roy Harris (1898 - 1979)
Hanns Eisler (1898 - 1962)
George Gershwin (1898 - 1937)
Francis Poulenc (1899 - 1963)
Alexander Tcherepnin (1899 - 1977)
Randall Thompson (1899 - 1984)
Edward Kennedy Ellington (1899 - 1974)
Carlos Chavez (1899 - 1978)
William Levi Dawson (1899 - 1990)
Silvestre Revueltas (1899 - 1940)

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20th Century

Michael Dewar Head (1900 - 1976)
Kurt Weill (1900 - 1950)
Aaron Copland (1900 - 1990)
Hans Erich Apostel (1901 - 1972)
Marcel Poot (1901 - 1988)
Edmund Rubbra (1901 - 1986)
Gerald Finzi (1901 - 1956)
Joaquín Rodrigo (1901 - 1999)
Maurice Durufle (1902 - 1986)
Sir William Turner Walton (1902 - 1983)
William Joseph (Billy) Mayerl (1902 - 1959)
Richard Rodgers (1902 - 1979)
Sir Lennox Berkeley (1903 - 1989)

Aram Il'yich Khachaturian (1903 - 1978)
Vittorio Giannini (1903 - 1966)
John Antill (1904 - 1986)
Richard Addinsell (1904 - 1977)
Dmitri Borisovich Kabalevsky (1904 - 1987)
Nathan Milstein (1904 - 1992)
Ernesto Halffter (1905 - 1989)
Eugene Bozza (1905 - 1991)
Alan Rawsthorne (1905 - 1971)
Matyas Seiber (1905 - 1960)
Eduard Tubin (1905 - 1982)
Daniel Sternefeld (1905 - 1986)
Dag Ivar Wiren (1905 - 1986)
William Alwyn (1905 - 1985)
Benjamin Frankel (1906 - 1973)
Dmitri Shostakovich (1906 - 1975)
Paul Creston (1906 - 1985)
Mozart Camargo Guarnieri (1907 - 1993)
Oedoen Partos (1907 - 1977)
Hugo Distler (1908 - 1942)
Howard Ferguson (1908 -)
Olivier Messiaen (1908 - 1992)
Paul Constantinescu (1909 - 1963)
Julius Chajes (1910 - 1985)
Samuel Barber (1910 - 1981)
Ronald Binge (1910 - 1979)

William Howard Schuman (1910 - 1992)
Alan Hovhaness (1911 - 2000)
Bernard Herrmann (1911 - 1975)
Gustav Allan Pettersson (1911 - 1980)
Witold Lutoslavski (1913 - 1994)
Lord Benjamin Britten (1913 - 1976)
William Southcombe Lloyd Webber (1914 - 1982)
Harold Truscott (1914 - 1992)
Bernard Stevens (1916 - 1983)
Alberto Ginastera (1916 - 1983)
Bernd Alois Zimmermann (1918 - 1970)
Leonard Bernstein (1918 - 1990)
Mieczysław Weinberg (1919 - 1996)
James Clifton Williams (1923 - 1976)
Kenneth Leighton (1929 - 1988)

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